Japan in the Free World Economy: A Statement on National Policy by the Research and Policy Committee of the Committee for Economic Development

By Keizai Doyukai; United Nations Environment Programme | Go to book overview

THE COMMITTEE FOR
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
The Committee for Economic Development is composed of 200 leading businessmen and educators.CED is devoted to these basic objectives:
1. To develop, through objective research and discussion, findings and recommendations for business and public policy which will contribute to the preservation and strengthening of our free society, and to the maintenance of high employment, increasing productivity and living standards, greater economic stability and greater opportunity for all our people.
2. To bring about increasing public understanding of the importance of these objectives and the ways in which they can be achieved.

CED's work is supported by voluntary contributions from business and industry. It is nonprofit, nonpartisan and nonpolitical.

The Trustees, who generally are Presidents or Board Chairmen of corporations and Presidents of universities, are chosen for their individual capacities rather than as representatives of any particular interests. They unite scholarship with business judgment and experience in analyzing the issues and developing recommendations to resolve the economic problems that constantly arise in a dynamic and democratic society.

Through this business-academic partnership, CED endeavors to develop policy statements and other research products that commend themselves as guides to public and business policy; for use as texts in college economic and political science courses and in management training courses; for consideration and discussion by newspaper and magazine editors, columnists and commentators, and for distribution abroad to promote better understanding of the American economic system.

CED believes that by enabling businessmen to demonstrate constructively their concern for the general welfare, it is helping business to earn and maintain the national and community respect essential to the successful functioning of the free enterprise capitalist system.

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