Africa Speaks

By James Duffy; Robert A. Manners | Go to book overview

Nyasaland: Secession the Only Solution

BY M. W. KANYAMA CHIUME

"Partnership," "Equal rights for civilized people," "Economic development" -- these and many other catchwords and phrases have been used by European settlers, backed by the British Government, to conceal from the United States and the whole world their real motives for the establishment of the Central African Federation. The list could be longer, and perhaps more will be invented as these prove less convincing. The world may be impressed for some time; many may be impressed all the time; but never in the history of the struggle of man have the words of Lincoln been truer: "You may fool all the people some of the time; you can even fool some of the people all the time; but you can't fool all of the people all the time." The Africans of Nyasaland in particular and Central Africa in general are indeed not going to be fooled all the time.

Truly this does not mean that there are not a few Africans who support Europeans. Indeed, we would have been surprised if such people did not exist, for we believe ours is a normal society and as such, such people must exist. Some do so for money (and quite a lot of money is used for this purpose), others for sheer opportunism; many from inferiority complexes, and perhaps a number for lack of understanding of the issues at stake.

The presence of such people in our society, however, must not be taken as a reflection of the general view of the people just as the presence in America of Communists could not be taken as the reflection of the ideological stand of the Americans.

We of Nyasaland are part of a continent which is determined to have no masters other than the people of Africa themselves. As for this, there is no going back, and those who are now temporarily controlling our destiny can only delay but will never prevent the in

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Africa Speaks
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction - Black Man''s Land- The Fact and the Fable 1
  • I- The Independence of Africa 9
  • Vision of Africa 13
  • The African and Democracy 28
  • Africa''s Destiny 35
  • Positive Action in Africa 48
  • II- The Problems of Freedom 59
  • Ghana 61
  • Togo 71
  • Reflections on Togolese and African Problems 72
  • Republic of the Congo 80
  • The Independence of the Congo 90
  • III- Africa in Transition 95
  • Tanganyika 97
  • Tanganyika, the Challenge of Tomorrow 99
  • Kenya 107
  • The Central African Federation 120
  • Southern Rhodesia- Apartheid Country 130
  • The Problems of Federation 144
  • Nyasaland- Secession the Only Solution 152
  • IV- An Antique Colonialism 163
  • Portuguese Africa 165
  • V- Union of South Africa 179
  • South Africa Today 183
  • Bantu Policy in South Africa 195
  • The Free World''s Other Face 204
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