New Viewpoints in Georgia History

By Albert B. Saye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
The Genesis of Georgia

"DINED with brother Percival, and in the evening met as usual the Trustees of the Georgia Colony, where Mr. Oglethorpe brought us the charter, which was signed the 9th inst., but did not pass all the offices till this week."1 Thus wrote John, Lord Viscount Percival in his Diary on June 29, 1732. This Charter is the first great landmark in the constitutional history of Georgia; hence the conditions under which it was granted are of fundamental importance to the present study.

The two decades prior to 1732 witnessed half a dozen attempts at setting up new English colonies in America. Many of them contained much in common with the later project of James Edward Oglethorpe which culminated in establishing the Colony of Georgia. In 1717 Captain Thomas Coram, best remembered today as the founder of the Foundling Hospital, presented a proposal to the British Government on behalf of himself, the Marquis de Wignancourt, and other French gentlemen for erecting a colony between Nova Scotia and Maine to be called the "Royall Province of Georgia." 2 His petition set forth the supply of naval stores as the chief objective of the new colony. This same objec-

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1
Diary of John Percival, First Earl of Egmont (Hist. MSS. Reports, 3 vol., London, 1920-23), 1, 282.
2
Two other attempts at establishing a new colony significant to the present study both from the use of the name Georgia and similarity to Oglethorpe's project in certain other respects may be noted at this point: David Dunbar, who as commissioner to stop the waste of the King's woods in North America was the most frequent correspondent of the Board of Trade in the year 1730, proposed in that year that a "Province of Georgia" be established at the same locale which Coram had chosen. The main object was defense against the Indians. The Board of Trade disapproved of

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New Viewpoints in Georgia History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I- The Genesis of Georgia 3
  • Chapter II- The Execution of a Trust 51
  • Chapter III- A Model Royal Colony 106
  • Chapter IV- The Revolution 134
  • Chapter V- Early State Government 157
  • Chapter VI- The Federal Union 196
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 249
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