New Viewpoints in Georgia History

By Albert B. Saye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
A Model Royal Colony

DURING the half century between the creation of the Board of Trade in 1696 and the surrender of the Charter of Georgia in 1752, the British government adopted a well defined colonial policy now familiarly known as "the old colonial system." The demands of trade and the necessity of adequate military defense against France explain why British statesmen determined to centralize control of the Colonies in the hands of the Crown, and to maintain the greatest uniformity possible in colonial policy.1 The authority of the Trustees over Georgia had been designed as temporary in the first place. Georgia would now become a royal colony and be made to conform to the established colonial pattern. Yet it would have been far too much to expect that the inept British colonial administration of that day would have made provision for the new Colony in advance of the actual transfer of control to the Crown. In any case, the Charter had been surrendered a year before the date of its expiration.

Lest confusion arise in the Colony during the transitional period, the Trustees suggested that the existing officers be empowered to remain in authority until the establishment of a new administration under the Crown.2 This suggestion was followed, and on June 25, 1752, the date of the formal surrender of control by the Trustees, a proclama-

____________________
1
Charles M. Andrews, The Colonial Background of the American Revolution ( New Haven, 1924), 17. For a more extensive account, see Vol. IV, passim, of The Colonial Period of American History ( New Haven, 1938), by the same author.
2
C.O.5/671, 208.

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Viewpoints in Georgia History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I- The Genesis of Georgia 3
  • Chapter II- The Execution of a Trust 51
  • Chapter III- A Model Royal Colony 106
  • Chapter IV- The Revolution 134
  • Chapter V- Early State Government 157
  • Chapter VI- The Federal Union 196
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.