Eisenhower and the American Crusades

By Herbert S. Parmet | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
The Forces for Ike

T HE MOVEMENT TO get Eisenhower to run and the campaign to win the GOP's nomination resembled, in many ways, the Willkie drive of 1940. Both drives were for political amateurs and, not surprisingly, both were suspected of having been engineered by Democrats. Unquestionably also they were strong personalities who were regarded by the public as "above politics." A popular following among the apolitical centrists, therefore, became a vital constituency in 1952 as it had been a dozen years earlier. That neither had ever stood for elective office was more of an asset than a liability. Their cadre and so-called grass-roots support were mobilized largely by businessmen concerned about international as well as domestic commercial interests; and, although such devotees to the crusades behind Willkie and Eisenhower were often small-town bankers and investors, the most influential and powerful sources were in the country's major financial quarters, particularly New York and Boston. Furthermore, the 1952 campaign aimed against a continuation of the New Deal that Mr. Willkie had failed to stop. Both campaigns brought convention victories for the so-called Eastern Establishment of the Republican party.

Such comparisons become important only when trying to understand the persistent dilemma of the moderate and liberal wings of the GOP, largely in the East. A closer view, however, suggests some contrasts. The same businessmen who had helped Willkie against Arthur Vandenberg, Robert A. Taft and Thomas E. Dewey had aligned themselves, by the early 1950s, with Dewey to elect Eisenhower. And their advantages were significant. Unlike Willkie, Eisenhower had never been a Democrat but

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eisenhower and the American Crusades
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 662

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.