Eisenhower and the American Crusades

By Herbert S. Parmet | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 31
Two Scorpions in a Bottle

W ITH A CROWD OF about three thousand on hand that afternoon, the Presidential party, marked by a long fleet of limousines, pulled up at the north esplanade of the United Nations. The Chief Executive, tanned from the Bermuda sun, emerged from his car. He waved his gray hat and grinned toward those behind the police barricades and walked to the entrance, where he shook hands with Dag Hammarskjöld. Then, before entering the Hall of Assembly, he went to the Meditation Room, better known at the UN as the "prayer room," in accordance with his special request that the schedule permit additional time for a brief visit to the small chamber. Then, stepping to the lectern before an audience of 3,500, he received a notably warm reception.1

For those few hours on December 8, 1953, the President was neither the leader of a political party nor a conciliator. More truly he represented the morality of mankind appealing to the aspirations of the "free world." His mission had thus given him the kind of opportunity he had long anticipated. With the British and the French still at Bermuda, the Columbine had taken him to New York City's La Guardia Field.

In August the Russians had detonated a hydrogen bomb. That news increased the urgency of the President's desire to respond to demands that he show what the United States was willing to do about the dangerous atomic race. Even before the unsettling development, during the early days of the Administration, an advisory group headed by Dr. Oppenheimer (who, by December 8, was being separated from security information by a "blank wall") reported that some solution had to be found for the possible consequences of the mindless drive toward nu-

-385-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eisenhower and the American Crusades
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 662

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.