Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate

By Wolf Schneider; Ingeborg Sammet et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
A THOUSAND AND ONE CITIES

THE CITY of Hangchow -- what do we know about it? Hardly more than that it is located in China, even though it was once the largest and richest city in the world. But the fame of a city passes, especially when it is so far away. And it was in far-away Asia that the greatest builders and destroyers of cities in the Middle Ages had their field of activity. Among the few prominent. European cities at the end of the first millennium were Córdoba and Seville in Spain, and Palermo in Sicily, and all three were Arabic.

From the eighth century on, Islam, the new world religion, had been expanding till it reached from Spain to India. A garland of great cities surrounded the Islamic world: Cairo in Egypt, Damascus in Syria, Shiraz, Tabriz, and Isfahan in Persia, Samarkand and Bukhara in Turkistan, Kanauj and Delhi in India.

Mohammed's successors bore the title of Caliph, and to their people they were both pope and emperor. At first, the Caliph's residence was in Medina, the Holy City of Arabia, and Mohammed's final resting place; then in Damascus, which had in the past been subjected to Assyrian, Babylonian, and Roman masters; and finally in Baghdad, the cosmopolitan city of the Islamic world. Caliph al-Mansur developed the little town of Baghdad into a military encampment and glorious metropolis. It was situated on the bank of the river Tigris, only about fifty miles north of ancient Babylon. After Kish, Babylon, and Seleucia and Ctesiphon, Baghdad was the fifth and so far last great city centre in the heart of the tworiver country, where so many historical events had taken place. The caliphs made Baghdad not only the centre of the new world religion, but also a citadel of the sciences second to none (except possibly, Byzantium), and one of the largest trading centres on earth. The river Tigris is navigable up to Baghdad, and the city was situated at the crossroads of the caravan routes from Persia, Asia Minor, Egypt, and the Arabian peninsula. Caliph Harun-alRashid, who reigned from 786 to 809, built a bridge across the Tigris, extended the city area to the east bank of the river, and thus made Baghdad four times the size of Rome. He invited artists and scientists to his court and had communication with Charlemagne.

Haruns sense of justice is spoken of in glowing terms in The

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.