trail, and that they were very angry with him for taking her off. They hurried on until they came to the mountains. They climbed a high mountain, and then Wild-Cat told the girl to wait there for him. He went away and disappeared among the trees and rocks, but soon returned with another large Wild-Cat, who he said was his grandfather. While the three sat down to rest and talk they heard voices, and the girl knew that they were her brothers' voices. They arose and ran deep into the forest, but still they could hear the voices from the three brothers, who were gaining on them. At last they caught up with them and were very angry. They were going to fight the Wild-Cats, who, of course, were dressed like men, so the brothers did not know that they were Wild-Cats. The sister cried and promised her brothers that she would soon return to her home if they would go and leave them. The brothers at last yielded to her requests and went back home and told her father and mother all that had happened. The father became very angry and swore that he would find his daughter and kill her or the man. He went to the mountains and wandered about in search of her for many days, without food or drink or sleep, until he died.


45. THE WOMAN WHO TRIED TO KILL HER SON.*

At the beginning of this world the people and animals could understand each other and visited each other. There lived in those times a man and wife and one child, a boy about seven years of age. The people called the man Hunter, because he was very fond of hunting and hunted from morning until evening. While he was out, his wife, who was a very cross woman, abused her own boy, as she always did, because she disliked him. She told the boy to stay at home while she went away for a short time. She went out and was gone for a long time. Finally she came back and told the boy to go along with her. While she was gone she had been working hard digging a deep hole in the ground, and when she went after the boy she took him to the hole and threw him in. The hole was so deep that it was impossible for the boy to get out. She put some brush over it to keep any one from finding him. When Hunter returned home he asked his wife where his son was, and she told him she did not know where he was; that she had been looking for him all day long. Then they both went out to look for the boy, but she would not take the man near the place where the hole was, and so they did not find him. They looked until night, and again the next day and the next.

____________________
*
Told by Annie Wilson.

-77-

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