come over and make him a visit, and Woodpecker promised that he would. Some time later Woodpecker remembered his promise and so started out to find Coyote's lodge. He found it, and Coyote, much pleased, invited him to come in and be seated. Woodpecker entered and was surprised to see a big bunch of burning straw on Coyote's head. "Ah, take that off. You will burn your head." Coyote only smiled, and replied in a calm voice: "Oh, no; that will not burn my head. I always wear it. I was told in the beginning that I would wear a light on my head at nights so that I can do whatever I like to while others are in darkness." He had no more than finished speaking when the hair on his head caught fire. He began to scream and try to put it out, but could not. He ran out of his lodge screaming for help. Woodpecker waited for him to return, but he did not come.


59. COYOTE, THE DEEP, AND THE WIND.*

One time when Coyote was out hunting something to eat he met Deer. Deer asked Coyote where he was going, and Coyote told him that he was going out hunting. Deer asked Coyote how he killed his game, for he noticed that he carried no bow and arrows. "I can kill anything I can get my hands on," said Coyote. "But how do you get close enough to get your hands on your game?" Deer asked. "Sometimes I run the game down, sometimes I catch them asleep." Deer said: "I am considered good food; even the human beings are very fond of my flesh. If you can catch me I will let you kill me and eat me." Deer started to run, and Coyote started after him, but soon lost sight of him and gave out. He went on home, but he could not help thinking of Deer's offer, and wondering how he could catch him. He wandered about trying to find him asleep, but never did. One time, after Coyote had been out searching to find Deer asleep, he grew very tired and lay down in the tall grass to take a nap. When he awoke he heard some one singing near by. He was badly frightened and sat up straight and rubbed his eyes and peeped about. He saw no one, but as he sat still and listened again he heard his name mentioned in the song. He jumped up and ran as fast as he could; yet he always heard the voice singing in his ears, just as near as when he woke up. He ran as fast and far as he could; then he dropped down to die. While he was panting, he heard the voice again, and it was so near that he heard these words: "If Coyote ever kills a Deer he shall be as fleet as he, and I who am singing am going to give him power to catch a Deer. I am the Wind." Coyote's fear vanished, and he arose and barked at

____________________
*
Told by White-Bread.

-95-

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