ABSTRACTS.

1. THE CREATION AND EARLY MIGRATIONS.

In beginning darkness rules. Man comes, and soon there is village with thousands of people. Man disappears; returns with seeds. He says Sun is coming and will be given power by Great-Father-Above. Unknown man tells people to select chief. In council is Coyote, who tells people to call unknown man Moon, because he is first created man on earth. People make Moon chief, and he selects errand-man to summon people, and chief tells them they are to move to better world. They divide into groups and select leaders, and chief gives each leader drum and tells them to sing and beat their drums. None of them is to look back, lest they should be stopped and stay in darkness. People move westward and come out of ground to another world. Coyote tells chief world is too small, and looks back. Half go back and others go on west. Chief throws dirt in front of him and forms high mountains. People come to mountains and there make their first homes. Moon goes to mountain top and sees people have scattered in different directions. When together they spoke Caddo; now each group speaks different language. Moon says direction to right is north, or cold side; that to left south, or warm side. Sun comes up from east and goes down in west. He goes too fast to do any good, so Coyote starts eastward and tells Sun he wants to talk with him. They walk together slowly, and when half way to west Coyote tells Sun he is going to defecate and asks him to wait a while. Coyote goes behind bushes and then runs away. Sun waits; then starts on slowly, still waiting for Coyote. Beginning of real people was in village called Tall-Timber-on-Top-of-the-Hill. Moon calls people together first time in new world, and says child will soon be born of woman and will have more power than any one else. He will name himself Medicine-Screech- Owl, after former chief, and have with him bow and arrows. Child comes and has bow and arrows. On his first birthday he names himself Medicine-Screech-Owl. He says bow and arrows are for men to kill game. He teaches people to make bows and arrows. In those times animals talked to human beings and they understood one another. Afterward some human beings turned into animals. Medicine- Screech-Owl visits most ferocious animals in behalf of people. People have little to eat, except man and woman known as Buzzard, who have plenty of meat. Coyote, in order to find out where they get so much meat, turns into dog. Buzzards find little dog. Man says it is not real dog. To find out whether it is real dog, woman pinches its ear and it howls like dog. Man tells woman to give dog some meat to see whether it eats fast. She does so, and Coyote takes his time in eating it. So Buzzard believes woman and they keep dog. Coyote stays with them until meat gives out and then watches them. Buzzard starts out after more meat, leaving dog at home. He follows and finds out where they get their meat. Three days afterward he goes to cave with rock as door, where he had seen Buzzards at work. He opens place and out come thousands of buffalo. Buzzard discovers what has happened, but dog has gone. Coyote tells people to make bows and arrows, as buffalo are coming. Buzzards now have to took for dead meat; so they become real buzzards. As time passes on, people notice that Moon pays no attention to

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