Habits of Industry: White Culture and the Transformation of the Carolina Piedmont

By Allen Tullos | Go to book overview

4
A History of Industry

"The Time for Prosperity Is at Hand"

Residents and observers of the Carolinas in 1870s and 1880s assumed that the future, like the past, lay with farming. "Know as we do," affirmed a Charlotte newspaperman in August 1869, "that upon the cultivation of our soil and the strong arms of our farmers depends the future prosperity and general advancement of our country."1 In market towns throughout the Piedmont, the yeoman ideal was extolled and catered to by local editors and their merchant advertisers:

The crowded appearance of our streets yesterday convinced us that the fall trade had in reality commenced. From the time the sun first gilded the eastern horizon with his golden rays, till far up in the day, wagons could be seen wending their way into the city from every direction, laden with cotton, flour, oats, wheat and other produce, and by ten o'clock that portion of Trade Street known as "Cotton-town" was literally jammed with vehicles. Cotton, the principal article offered, though not bringing as good a price as it was a few weeks since, still commands remunerative figures, and we cannot but think it will again reach thirty cents a pound.

Our grocery merchants keep busy, and from the way bags, bales and bundles pass from the stores to the wagons, will have to replenish their stock long ere the season is over.2

Prospects for railroad links that would fully open the Piedmont to the world of trading and trafficking were harmonized by town editors with the needs of a region of diversified farmers: "We assume that the time for their prosperity is at hand. The world of the Railroad will soon commence, and they will have a good market for every thing we raise, from a bushel of wheat to an onion."3 With the coming of the railroad, however, Piedmont farming

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Habits of Industry: White Culture and the Transformation of the Carolina Piedmont
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - A View of the Landscape 16
  • 2 - The Customs of the Country 40
  • 3 - Labor of Loves 86
  • 4 - A History of Industry 134
  • 5 - The League Family of Poe Mill 172
  • 6 - Ethel Hilliard: a Pilgrim's Progress 205
  • 7 - Brown Lung Blues 255
  • Epilogue: the Industry of History 285
  • Notes 305
  • Guide to Sources 339
  • Acknowledgments 379
  • Index 383
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 419

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.