Habits of Industry: White Culture and the Transformation of the Carolina Piedmont

By Allen Tullos | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people have guided, accompanied, and encouraged this historical foray into the Carolina Piedmont. Those of us who worked with the Southern Oral History Program's Piedmont Industrialization Project are especially indebted to the retired mill workers, engineers, and manufacturers who recalled their lives on the region's farms and in its emerging textile towns. Their names appear in the endnotes and are listed in the Guide to Sources. The collection of interviews, conducted between 1975 and 1980, is available to researchers at the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Far north of the Carolina Piedmont, I found encouragement among the faculty and graduate students in American Studies at Yale University. I can imagine no more supportive adviser than Alabama native, Western historian, and comparative regional scholar Howard Lamar, who, amid his own teaching, writing, and administrative duties as dean of Yale College, regularly discussed and improved my drafts and revisions.

At every stage of the writing I benefited from the keen eye and critical counsel of Jean-Christophe Agnew, who always knew better than to leave well enough alone.

During C. Vann Woodward's final year of graduate seminars on the history of the South, I completed papers that form parts of two chapters in this book. Professor Woodward's attention then, and in later correspondence and discussions about the manuscript, have left me, among a large and excellent company, in his lien.

In New Haven, Bill Ferris offered a sustaining cheer in the difficult early going. Kai Erikson encouraged my joining of biography with an investigation of regional ethos. Charles F. Montgomery taught me to look more closely at a world of material objects and their makers. George Rosen and Arthur Viseltear oversaw a year-long exploration into southern public health history.

During my sojourns in and visits to Chapel Hill, Daniel W. Patterson,

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Habits of Industry: White Culture and the Transformation of the Carolina Piedmont
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - A View of the Landscape 16
  • 2 - The Customs of the Country 40
  • 3 - Labor of Loves 86
  • 4 - A History of Industry 134
  • 5 - The League Family of Poe Mill 172
  • 6 - Ethel Hilliard: a Pilgrim's Progress 205
  • 7 - Brown Lung Blues 255
  • Epilogue: the Industry of History 285
  • Notes 305
  • Guide to Sources 339
  • Acknowledgments 379
  • Index 383
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