Democracy in Latin America: Colombia and Venezuela

By Donald L. Herman | Go to book overview

1
Democratic and Authoritarian Traditions

Donald L. Herman


DEMOCRATIC TRADITION

Elite Accommodation

Today most Latin American countries contain elements of the democratic tradition similar to the Anglo-American practice of liberal democracy, including the procedural norms of freedom of organization and political action, extensive citizen participation, individual rights, political parties, interest-group activity, and a relatively free press. Although many scholars contend that democratic procedures are foreign imports, grafted onto the Latin American societies by political elites who are convinced that modernization requires them, the democratic tradition has a comparatively long history in several of the countries. The basis of that tradition is an accommodation among the elites of the principal political parties. Once they agree that democracy is in their interests and that violent conflicts between them should be brought to an end, they must be prepared to develop a long-term mutually beneficial relationship. Thus, a crucial variable in Latin America is the democratic leaders' attitude toward the political opposition. Not only must they accept the idea of opposition as an abstract principle but also the legitimacy of specific opposition groups and the interests they represent. This requires a degree of tolerance and willingness to compromise that is very difficult, it not impossible, for many Latin American political leaders. 1

Elite accommodation in Colombia and Venezuela exemplifies varying degrees of consociational practices. 2 According to Lipjhart, the elites in a political system consciously agree to a set of rules to help sustain the democratic regime against threats. Rather than appeals to mass social mobilization that may weaken the tenuous democratic edifice in its early stages, they rely on consultation and

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Democracy in Latin America: Colombia and Venezuela
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.