Critical Theory and Political Possibilities: Conceptions of Emancipatory Politics in the Works of Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, and Habermas

By Joan Alway | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people have stimulated, encouraged, sustained, advised, and assisted me in this project, and it goes without saying that my debt to them is the type that can be repaid only by offering the same support to others. But I also could not bring this project to completion without specifically acknowledging some of the people and institutions that have played a major role in my work.

This work is very much a product of my graduate education in the Department of Sociology at Brandeis University. Gila Hayim first introduced me to Critical Theory and for over a decade has been an invaluable teacher, mentor, and friend. George Ross not only taught me a great deal about political sociology, he also guided me through many a rough spot, always offering support, respect, and encouragement. The intellectual stimulation and challenges provided by Egon Bittner, Kurt Wolff, Kathleen Barry, and Ralph Miliband continue to influence my work.

Jeff Livesay and John Murphy read and commented on this work at pivotal points in its development. I am deeply grateful to them both for their comments, recommendations, and encouragement. David Wallace's reading of the manuscript was an unexpected and generous gift and I have been particularly fortunate to have the assistance of Charmaine Clarke in the final stages of preparing this manuscript.

Todd Crosset, Rose DeLuca, and Jean Papalia are three very special individuals who have been there from beginning to end with support, advice, and undemanding friendship. My thanks also to Tommie Bower, Nancy Reed, Cheryl Gordon, and to a community of friends whose timely reminders on how to keep things simple and in their proper perspective helped sustain me.

I would also like to thank my former colleagues and students at the Harvard University Committee on Degrees in Social Studies for providing a stimulating and supportive environment for my writing and teaching, and my new

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