INTRODUCTION

A young woman was so anxious whenever she left home that she was unable to do so unaccompanied; and yet when a car in which she was a passenger was involved in an accident, she kept her head, gave first aid and called for the police without hesitation. A laboratory assistant, one of whose regular duties was to take samples of blood from experimental animals, became anxious and nearly fainted, as he watched a sample of his own blood being taken by a doctor. Another man seemed entirely at ease as the doctor he had consulted took his history but started trembling like a leaf when he was asked to lie on the examination couch.

There is something peculiar about these three incidents. Why should a woman who can deal competently with an emergency be terrified at the prospect of walking out of her front door? Why should a man who takes blood from animals daily be upset by being on the receiving end of a procedure he knows well? And why should a man who trusts his doctor enough to visit him and talk freely to him be alarmed at the prospect of being examined by him? In each case an intense and distressing emotional reaction has been evoked by a situation which seems inappropriate and inadequate to cause it.

There is, however, nothing peculiar about the emotional

-xi-

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Anxiety and Neurosis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Anxiety, Fear And Expectancy 1
  • Chapter 2 - Anxiety, Fright And Shock 16
  • Chapter 3 - Anxiety, Guilt And Depression 36
  • Chapter 4 - Inhibitions, Symptoms And Anxiety 55
  • Chapter 5 - Defence And Adaptive Behaviour 69
  • Chapter 6 - The Neuroses 95
  • Chapter 7 - Treatment of The Neuroses 128
  • Bibliography 145
  • Index 151
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