Chinese Arms Transfers: Purposes, Patterns, and Prospects in the New World Order

By R. Bates Gill | Go to book overview

and "weapons transfers," "weapons supplies," and "weapons exports" are used interchangeably as the broadest term to describe shipments of major conventional weapons from one country to another, whether directly or through a third party. Other military-related transfers -- personnel equipment, small arms (such as sidearms and rifles), ammunition, grenades and mortar shells, troops, training, advisers, and military construction projects (such as air bases and naval ports), and the transfer of military technology and know-how, including nuclear technology -- will be described as such and are not typically included as major conventional weapons transfers. The term "arms sales" is used to describe transfers where economic gain appears to be a primary motive for the transaction. For abbreviations used throughout the work, please consult the abbreviations list.

The terms "People's Republic of China," "China," and "PRC" are used interchangeably. By and large, the romanization system adopted by the Chinese government in 1979, also known as "pinyin," is used to transliterate Chinese into English, with only one or two exceptions. Thus, the founder of the PRC was Mao Zedong, his principal adviser in foreign affairs was Zhou Enlai, and they ruled from China's capital, Beijing. However, the spiritual father of modern China is referred to by his betterknown name, Sun Yat-sen. Chinese authors and terms in footnotes and in the bibliography retain their English spellings as they appear in the original.


NOTES
1
Wu is quoted in "China defends Saudi missile sale", Financial Times ( 7 April 1988), 1. See also the more recent remarks in defense of Chinese arms transfers in "Shuo renjia, xian yong jingzi zhao zijia [Before criticizing others, first look yourself in the mirror]", Renmin Ribao ( 12 July 1991).
2
International Institute for Strategic Studies, Strategic Survey, 1988-89 ( London: International Institute for Strategic Studies, 1989), 23.
3
"Aggression In The Gulf: A Partnership of Nations", Vital Speeches of the Day ( 15 October 1990), 3.
4
"State of the Union, 1991", Vital Speeches of the Day ( 15 February 1991), 258.
5
"The Possibility of A New World Order: Unlocking the Promise of Freedom", Vital Speeches of the Day ( 15 May 1991), 451.
6
"The Challenge of Building Peace: A Renewal of History", Vital Speeches of the Day ( 15 October 1991), 4.
7
Studies on these questions would include Francis Fukuyama, "The End of History?", The National Interest (Summer 1989); Samuel P. Huntington, "No Exit: The Errors of Endism", The National Interest (Fall 1989); Richard Barnet, "After the Cold War", The New Yorker ( 1 January 1990); John J. Mearsheimer, "Why We Will Soon Miss the Cold War", The Atlantic ( August 1990).

-21-

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