The Southern Common People: Studies in Nineteenth-Century Social History

By Edward Magdol; Jon L. Wakelyn | Go to book overview

Leon Fink


"Irrespective of Party, Color or Social Standing": The Knights of Labor and Opposition Politics in Richmond, Virginia

Labor reform political slates sprang up in hundreds of cities and towns across the United States in 1886-87, including at least 21 cities in eight southern states. 1 In Richmond, Virginia, following impressive economic victories by the Knights of Labor, a workingmen's ticket swept control of the municipal government in May, 1886 and went on confidently to challenge the Bourbon incumbents for Congress the coming fall. Success rested on the cooperation of disaffected white Democrats with black Republicans. Some observers felt that they were witnessing the beginning of a major political and social upheaval. Yet, on November's election day, no labor candidate appeared on the ballot and no more labor politics, to speak of, existed in Richmond.

Little is yet known about southern lower-class movements, black or white, in the Gilded Age. Recent political and social history, however, concentrated in local studies, suggests that the South was less "solid" than it once appeared. The new scholarship has challenged the view (to use Carl Degler's words) "that after the failure of Reconstruction meaningful experiments in the social order were finished . . . and that the aspirations of blacks were decisively thwarted." Nevertheless, the race question in Richmond and elsewhere proved a formidable obstacle to every political movement from below. 2

* * *

____________________
Source: Labor History 19, no. 3 (Summer 1978): 325-49. Reprinted by permission of Labor History, original publisher and holder of copyright. Fink has restored a conclusion to the article which appears here for the first time. The author gratefully acknowledges the assistance and criticisms of Herbert Gutman, Susan Levine, Lawrence Goodwyn, David Montgomery, Eugene Genovese, Christopher Lasch, and Scott Ware in the preparation of this paper.

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Southern Common People: Studies in Nineteenth-Century Social History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.