The Southern Common People: Studies in Nineteenth-Century Social History

By Edward Magdol; Jon L. Wakelyn | Go to book overview

Contributors to Part II
Vernon Burton, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana, is a co-editor (with Robert C. McMath) of a volume of studies of southern communities in the nineteenth century, to be published by Greenwood Press.
W. E. B. Du Bois ( 1868-1963) was the author of more than a dozen books and hundreds of articles, reviews, editorials, and addresses. He received his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University in 1895. Dr. Du Bois was a pioneering and dominant force in American scholarship, and a leader of the equal rights movement.
Leon Fink, Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, is also the author of "Class Conflict in the Gilded Age: The Figure and the Phantom," Radical History Review ( 1975).
Lawrence C. Goodwyn, Professor of History at Duke University and Co-director of the Oral History Project of the Center for Southern Studies, is the author of Democratic Promise: The Populist Movement in America ( 1976).
Frank J. Huffman Jr., received his Ph.D. from Yale University and taught history at the University of Houston. He is currently assistant to the Executive Vice-President of E. H. Crump Companies, Inc., in Memphis, Tennessee. His essay is a revision of a paper presented at the November 1975 meeting of the Southern Historical Association at Washington, D.C.
Julie Roy Jeffrey, Associate Professor at Goucher College, Towson, Maryland, is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Social History, and the author of Frontier Women, The Trans-Mississippi West, 1840-1880 ( 1979).
Edward Magdol, Associate Professor of History at the State University College at Potsdam, New York, is also the author of A Right to the Land: Essays on the Freedmen's Community ( 1977) and Owen Lovejoy, Abolitionist in Congress ( 1967).

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