Against Long Odds: Citizens Who Challenge Congressional Incumbents

By James L. Merriner; Thomas P. Senter | Go to book overview

10
TEXAS
RON PAUL (R) v. REPRESENTATIVE GREG LAUGHLIN (D/R) AND CHARLES MORRIS (D)

Challengers sometimes win. It can happen. Almost always, though, there are special circumstances--the challenger was already a celebrity in another field, possessed overwhelming personal wealth, or faced a weak incumbent who was at odds with his party leaders or perhaps mired in an ethics mess.

Thus, Michael Flanagan won in Chicago after Dan Rostenkowski was destroyed by scandal. Also in Illinois, Democratic Senator Carol Moseley-Braun was defeated in 1998 under a personal financial cloud. More typically, Senator Paul Coverdell of Georgia upset Democratic incumbent Wyche Fowler by just 16,237 votes in a run-off election in 1992 after Fowler, a maverick first-termer, committed some political blunders. Once esconced in incumbency, Coverdell easily fended off a challenge from Democrat Michael Coles in 1998.

Sometimes, challengers win in part because they are former incumbents themselves and have learned to walk both sides of the campaign street. One former congressman, Joe DioGuardi in New York, was unsuccessful. Another, Ron Paul in Texas, won.

Paul captured a House seat as a Republican in 1996 by a weird combination of his own appeal as a candidate, local Texas politics, and national politics including hard-core conservatives and their supposed

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Against Long Odds: Citizens Who Challenge Congressional Incumbents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 185

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.