PREFACE

The beginnings of this book can be traced to 1962 when I first heard John Kirkpatrick's recording of Charles Ives "Concord" Sonata, the 78 RPM version on Columbia Records. Although the copy was much scratched from library use, my hearing of the music sparked an intense interest in Ives. During the 1963-1964 academic year at Cornell College, a tutorial with Winifred Van Etten on American literature, and transcendental literature in particular, led to undergraduate study on Charles Ives, which was completed under the devoted guidance of Delinda Roggensack. At Yale University I came into contact with the Ives Collection, and in 1966 I began working with the manuscripts. One result of these studies was the editing and performing of one of Ives's piano works, the Varied Air and Variations, and the eventual further reconstructing and editing of the work with John Kirkpatrick, who by the late 1960s had become a friend and an important influence in my ever-growing interest in American music.

I began to play the music of Gottschalk, Griffes, Ives, and contemporary American composers. In the summer of 1970, a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities allowed me to work in the Ives Collection at Yale and to obtain much of the information which has found its way into Chapter 5 of this book. Durthe 1971-1972 and 1973-1974 academic years, I taught a course in American music at Washington College. My enthusiasm for much of this music was by that time very great, and reflections on America's music in the form of a book became a necessity.

-xiii-

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Essays on American Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in American History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Plates xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Prologue 3
  • Chapter 1 The Yankee Tunesmiths 17
  • Chapter 2 Louis Moreau Gottschalk 49
  • Chapter 3 The American-Europeans 73
  • Chapter4 Charles Tomlinson Griffes 87
  • Chapter 5 Charles Edward Ives 105
  • Chapter 6 Quincy Porter: Composer-Professor 133
  • Chapter 7 Virgil Thomson 161
  • Chapter 8 The New Eclecticism 179
  • Epilogue 211
  • Notes 215
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 247
  • About the Author 261
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