Vatican Radio: Propagation by the Airwaves

By Marilyn J. Matelski | Go to book overview

of Paul VI (the most widely traveled pope in church history), as well as the initial decline of Vatican Radio as a credible international broadcast service. Chapter 7 discusses the reigns of Popes John Paul I and John Paul II, their visions of the Church, their relationship to the Society of Jesus and Opus Dei, their diplomatic priorities, and their mistrust of Vatican Radio. Chapter 8 addresses the future of Radio HVJ, a crazy quilt of mixed messages. Finally, to aid the reader in understanding both church and technical terms, a brief glossary may be found at the end of the book.


NOTES
1
The term "broadcasting" is used throughout as a synonym for any form of radio or television transmission. While some critics might argue that the word is technically incorrect when referring to shortwave signals, I adopt a larger context for "broadcasting," taken from its foundations in agriculture, i.e., a form of seed distribution in order to cover large areas of land.
2
Pope Pius XI "Addresses and Blesses the World in His First Radio Broadcast". New York Times ( February 13, 1931):14.
3
James J. Onder, "The Sad State of Vatican Radio", Educational Broadcasting Review ( August 1971):44.
4
From 1946 to 1951, Vatican Radio added eleven new languages to its programming service. Most of these were Eastern European: Hungarian, Romanian, Czech, Russian, Slovene, Slovak, Latin, Bulgarian, Croatian, Belorussian, and Albanian.
5
Camille M. Cianfarra, The Vatican and the War ( New York: E. P. Dutton, 1944), p. 42.

-xx-

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