4.

Although the blues has always been an expression of the attitudes and experiences of the Negro community in America it has never been accepted by the entire social group. Among both religious people and among the growing middle class professional groups there is often a dislike or a disinterest in the blues. The religious feeling is very strong, and in the South many singers who have become church members are reluctant to perform anything except church music. The preoccupations of the blues; love, sexuality, personal disappointment and unhappiness are felt to be an insistent reminder of the wordly life that the Christian should forget. This is a much stronger interpretation of Christian doctrine than the larger white society regards as necessary, but from his side of the color line it has always been obvious to the Negro that the "Christianity" of American society has never been more than a self-satisfied delusion. An objection that the religious people have made to the blues is that it isn't "true." Since they are thinking in terms of spiritual truth they have some reason for their attitude, but the singers object to this, feeling that the truth of experience is as valid as the revealed truth of religion. As Henry Townsend put it,

You know, I'm going to put this a little
blunt. I don't know if I should say it or not,
because it might hurt the religious type of
people, but when I sing the blues I sing the
truth. The religious type of people may not
believe that it's good, because they think the
blues is not the truth; but the blues, from a
point of explaining yourself as facts, is the
truth, and I don't feel that the truth should
be condemned . . .

The concerns of the blues, however, are not the concerns of the religious community, and the music is not an expression of their life and experience.

The attitudes of the professional groups, the growing intellectual class within the Negro society, are also not expressed in the blues. Except for the restrictions which

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Poetry of the Blues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Introduction 5
  • 1 7
  • 2 11
  • 3 27
  • 4 35
  • 5 43
  • 6 67
  • 7 80
  • 8 98
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 112

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.