Party Government in the United States of America

By William Milligan Sloane | Go to book overview

IX
PARTY DEVELOPMENT 1793-1797

British attitude toward the United States--Grievances against Great Britain--Grievances against France; Genet--Party alignment on these questions--Jay's Treaty; Washington's unpopularity--Inchoate policies in Congres--Washington's Farewell Address--Results of the election--Sectional division--Party attitude better defined.

THE first year of the American War was regarded by the British as a civil war, and the notion of a rebellious child became so deep-seated that even yet the attitude of Great Britain toward America is affected by a similar consideration. At the close of that first year the revolted colonies could possibly have dictated their own terms as colonies, becoming then what Canada and Australia now are, daughters in their father's house, mistress in their own. But the French alliance gave the character of foreign war to the struggle and united all Britons in bitterness toward America. The Whigs gained power long enough to make a peace, but it was a very imperfect peace, securing for the Confederation political independence without mercantile or economic liberty. This was understood by keen minds on both sides of the sea. Neither the American Confederation nor the Union provided funds to pay the debts due British subjects under the treaty of 1783. Great Britain in retaliation refused alike to evacuate her

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