Party Government in the United States of America

By William Milligan Sloane | Go to book overview

XIV
RISE OF PARTY GOVERNMENT 1813-1817

Discontent with War of 1812 a party matter--The rebellious attitude of New England--Inordinate demands of Great Britain-- The Convention at Hartford--Its menace of secession repudiated --Character of the Treaty of Ghent--Parties and internal affairs --Novelties in party management--Agitation for reform of electoral system--Internal improvements a paramount question.

THE Treasury was by this time in great straits, and the Thirteenth Congress was called in special session, lasting from May 24 to August 2, 1813, to consider ways and means in finance. The President's message set forth the necessities arising from the war, and informed the country that the Czar had offered to mediate. The administration majority in the House was strong ( Clayton was chosen Speaker by 89 votes to 54); in the Senate less so, because of personal jealousies and animosities. The routine business was duly transacted. Later Great Britain declined the Czar's mediation, and neither the measures passed nor the course of events could allay the ever-growing discontent with the struggle. To all the peace men and many administration men the great European conflict seemed near its end; and what might happen then to a small nation with narrow resources, single-handed against a powerful conqueror?

Particularly, the temper of New England became more and more defiant. The legislature of Connecti

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