Party Government in the United States of America

By William Milligan Sloane | Go to book overview

XV
THE PEOPLE'S REPRESENTATIVE 1817-1825

Monroe's political travels--Compromise on the tariff--The rise of Andrew Jackson--Missouri and the slavery question--Alignment of rising parties--The Missouri Compromises (three)--Monroe's "Era of Good Feeling"--Exercise of the Veto--The "scrub race" for the Presidency--The Monroe doctrine.

MONROE'S advent to the presidency was a further perpetuation of what is often styled the Virginia dynasty. The general condition of sentiment and opinion was fairly clear, as is manifest from the public press of the day; roads were somewhat improved, though transportation was still slow, even for coaching days. The party situation was most peculiar, as has been explained. Washington in his times of trial had found it profitable to travel extensively in the States and make the acquaintance of important men; Monroe determined to follow his example, and did so. He was heartily welcomed everywhere, and his journey seems to have accomplished two ends --the final extinction of the old Federalism, and the cementing of good-will among all classes, not of course to the extent of changing opinion, but at least to that of strengthening pleasant intercourse. Urged to appoint men of various minds to his Cabinet, he refused, and selected Democratic-Republicans only; the time did not seem ripe to place others in positions then regarded almost as a prerogative insuring further advancement in a political hierarchy.

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Party Government in the United States of America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 456

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.