Party Government in the United States of America

By William Milligan Sloane | Go to book overview

XVI
NEW DEVICES 1825-1829

Fusion of groups into parties in spite of divergent interests: Republicans -- Creation of a unitary opposition for lack of leaders and by pressure -- Democratic personalities degrade politics -- Deadlock of legislation -- Democrats in power -- The Tariff Bill of 1828 protective -- Irregular nominations for presidency -- Disappearance of Congress caucus -- Jackson's election; popular uprising -- Consequences of the peaceful upheaval: the extension of suffrage one cause -- Increase of population -- Tenure of and rotation in office -- Party as a unifying force.

THE record of John Quincy Adams's administration is dry and dreary as far as Congress is concerned. But this fact is significant: it was the inaction preceding a political storm. The two factions of loose- constructionists had made some sort of an arrangement and presented a united front with Adams as President and Clay as Secretary of State, apparently and by tradition in training for the presidency. The two factions in opposition, one under Crawford, already an invalid, and the other under Jackson, a man of destiny, were thus forced together and charged that the coalition between the opposing groups was a corrupt bargain. They made out a poor case, but put Clay on the defensive. This cemented the new party more firmly than ever, and they adopted the name National Republican and were heirs to the Federalists. Adams announced two newer policies in his message: protection, and a great general scheme of internal improvement at federal expense; roads and canals in order to tie all

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