Party Government in the United States of America

By William Milligan Sloane | Go to book overview

XVII
PARTY ORGANIZATION 1829-1833

Use of political patronage for party purposes--The new parties; Clay and Jackson--The Nullifiers--The "Great Debate." The pocket veto--Jackson's defiance to nullification--His aversion to the United States Bank--Party conventions--The tariff of 1833 quieted nullification--Significance of new nominating method-- The office of President representative.

POPULAR because honest, Jackson's first administration was strong indeed. Of all the processes enumerated not one continued without grinding friction, such were the animosities of ambitious men and such the confusion due to lack of institutions for expressing the popular will in extra-legal concerns of vital importance. With no hesitancy Jackson began to exercise his undoubted right of removal from office. Though there is evidence that he left more persons in office who were opposed to him than he removed, yet so far did he outrun all tradition and practice in the matter that even yet he is considered to have made a clean sweep, appointing to about seven hundred places, great and petty, on the principle of rotation and of office as a party fund, men who were his firm supporters. It was an effort to fortify himself against the thronging troubles now arraying themselves in fierce opposition. For long no victorious party hesitated to follow the example. Marcy, of New York, gave form to the doctrine: "The spoils of the enemy belong to the victor."

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Party Government in the United States of America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 456

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.