Party Government in the United States of America

By William Milligan Sloane | Go to book overview

XXVIII
CURRENCY, TARIFF, CIVIL SERVICE, LABOR 1877-1885

The issues of sound money and State rights--Struggles of President and Congress--Efforts of Congress to coerce the Executive--The conventions and the new political alignment--Assassination of Gaffield--Struggles for patronage: moral revival--Relations of capital and labor in politics--Evasion of new issues in party conventions--Relation of President to party organization.

THE popular vote for President in 1876 appeared to give a majority of two hundred and fifty thousand to the Democrats. This fact was not lost in the deliberations of the Republican administration. Grant had issued orders for the withdrawal of federal troops from South Carolina and Louisiana, Hayes enforced them, and the Democratic State governments were at once acknowledged. While the returning-boards had commissioned Republican electors the legislatures had not authorized them to choose State officers; the titles of both electors and State officials seemed therefore to possess equal legality. The summer was full of alarms owing to railroad strikes and consequent disorders. These were suppressed where the State governments felt it necessary, both in the North and the West, by the use of federal troops. The first session of the Forty-fifth Congress lasted from October 15, 1877, to December 3, 1877, and the second from December 3, 1877, to June 20, 1878. In the Senate the Republicans had a majority of three; in the House there was a Demo-

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