Males, Females, and Behavior: Toward Biological Understanding

By Lee Ellis; Linda Ebertz | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
Cerebral Asymmetry and Cognitive Performance Show Complementary Fluctuations across the Menstrual Cycle

Geoff Sanders and Deborah Wenmoth

Over the last decade, interest in possible biological influences on neuropsychological development and performance has focused on the possible role of hormones, specifically the gonadal steroids for which two distinct effects have been identified (for reviews, see Becker, Breedlove, & Crews, 1992; Nelson, 1995). During critical prenatal or perinatal periods, gonadal steroids exert permanent organizational effects on brain and behavior ( Collaer & Hines, 1995). In adulthood, these same hormones exert phasic activational effects ( Kimura & Hampson, 1994). One approach to the study of activational effects in humans is to look for potential changes in performance across the menstrual cycle. Such changes have been reported for cognitive performance and functional cerebral asymmetry and it is this relationship that we explore here.

In the review that follows, we shall show that reports of significant changes in functional cerebral asymmetry across the menstrual cycle reveal an inconsistent relationship between maximum asymmetry and point in cycle. However, we shall argue that this inconsistency disappears when direction of hemispheric advantage is considered. Right hemisphere tasks reveal greater asymmetry when estrogen is low, whereas left hemisphere tasks reveal greater asymmetry when estrogen is high. To support this position we describe data obtained from a dichotic listening study in which women performed two tasks at two points in their menstrual cycle. Our left hemisphere verbal task showed greater asymmetry during the midluteal phase, when estrogen is high, while our right hemisphere music task showed greater asymmetry at menses, when

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Males, Females, and Behavior: Toward Biological Understanding
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.