Glory Bound: Black Athletes in a White America

By David K. Wiggins | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

A number of important works, some of which are also mentioned in the introduction or included among the references, have been influential in my development as a sport historian and in my thinking about sport, race, and American culture. Perhaps no works have influenced my scholarship more than those that have touched upon African American cultural patterns, examined broad racial themes, and dealt with the complexities of skin color and racist stereotypes. Included among these works are: Lawrence W. Levine, Black Culture and Black Consciousness : Afro-American Folk Thought from Slavery to Freedom ( New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1977); David R. Roediger, The Wages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class ( New York: Verso, 1991); Winthrop D. Jordan , White over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812 ( Chapel Hill: Univ. of North Carolina Press, 1968); George M. Fredrickson , The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817-1914 ( New York: Harper & Row, 1971); John S. Haller Jr. , Outcasts from Evolution: Scientific Attitudes of Racial Inferiority, 1859-1900 ( Urbana: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1971); Burton W. Peretti, The Creation of Jazz: Music, Race, and Culture in Urban America ( Urbana: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1992); Joseph Boskin, Sambo: The Rise and Decline of an American Jester ( New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1986); Sterling Stuckey, Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America ( New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1987); and Roger D. Abrahams, Singing the Master: The Emergence of African American Culture in the Plantation South ( New York: Pantheon, 1992).

The overviews of African Americans in sport are generally not so impressive as the works mentioned above. However, there are some good (in several cases, excellent) works that provide important information and insights about African American athletes. I have found some useful information (and many photographs) on the history of African American athletes in such popular books as Jack Orr, The Black Athlete: His Story in American History ( New York: Lion Books, 1969); Jack Olsen, The Black Athlete: A Shameful Story ( New York: Time-Life books, 1968); Wally Jones and Jim Washington, Black Champions Challenge American Sports ( New York: David McKay, 1972); Andrew S. "Doc"

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