Constitutional Developments in Nigeria: An Analytical Study of Nigeria's Constitution-Making Developments and the Historical and Political Factors That Affected Constitutional Change

By Kalu Ezera | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT'S INITIATIVE FOR POLITICAL REFORMS AND THE EMERGENCE OF TRIBAL NATIONALISM

During 1948, several events took place in Nigeria which indicated that the Nigerian government was determined to take over the initiative for economic and political reforms and thereby destroy the ammunition of extreme nationalism. While it would be true to say that most of the reforms undertaken during this time had definitely been on the government's post-war reform schedule yet Nigerian nationalists and other pressure groups could probably claim that they, at least, compelled the government to accelerate drastically the tempo of that development, especially in the political field. An attempt is made here to show that the new initiative in political reforms came as a calculated policy strategy from the Colonial Office.


CONFERENCE OF AFRICAN GOVERNORS

In November 1947, there was a conference in London of African Governors and Governors-designate from Gambia, the Gold Coast, Nigeria, Kenya, Sierra Leone, and the Rhodesias.1 Under the chairmanship of the Secretary of State for the Colonies, Arthur Creech Jones, this Conference lasted from November 8 to 21.

The Conference reviewed the progress already made in the political and constitutional developments in the various territories and discussed the problems to be faced in building representative and responsible political institutions in these territories.2 But it was evident to the Conference that all African colonial territories were not in the same category. Thus, what was considered an

____________________
1
The Times, London, November 22, 1947.
2
West Africa, November 29, 1947, p. 1177.

-82-

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