Economic History of the United States

By Chester W. Wright | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
ECONOMIC CONDITIONS UNDER THE CONFEDERATION AND THE ADOPTION OF THE CONSTITUTION, 1783-1789

The Outstanding Economic Problems of the Period. The years from 1783 to 1789 under the Confederation are frequently spoken of as the critical period in our history. It was a period during which the great question at issue was whether the particular economic or political interests of the different states and the general spirit of individualism would so undermine the power of the central government that the country would degenerate into a weak and impotent confederacy of independent sovereign states; or whether, through a spirit of cooperation and mutual sacrifice of special interests, furthered by a vision of the greater gain that eventually might accrue to all, they could overcome these disintegrating tendencies and unite in establishing a central government sufficiently strong to promote the general well-being and to command the respect of the world. The importance of the actual outcome for the future economic development of the country can scarcely be exaggerated; yet the issue often appeared to be hanging in the balance. In the final decision economic conditions and forces played a vital part and an understanding of them is thus essential, for it may be said that there is scarcely another such brief period of peace in our history when the interaction of current economic and political conditions was more charged with portentous significance for the future of the country.

On the side of the economic life there were two outstanding problems which mark the period. One was the necessity for readjusting the economic life to more normal peacetime conditions. This problem is a part of the aftermath of any serious and protracted war and must be reckoned among the economic disturbances and losses arising from war. Although it has been said that in the case of the Revolution the nature of the economic organization of the country was such that the disorganization was not so great as it would otherwise have been, it is also to be borne in mind that the economic readjustments necessary after the war were further complicated by the fact that political independence had been attained. Though there is danger of exaggerating the economic effects of political independence, these somewhat increased the difficulties of readjustment. The second problem included (1) the establishment of a form of govern-

-228-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic History of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1122

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.