Economic History of the United States

By Chester W. Wright | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XLII
ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF THE WORLD WAR YEARS

Introduction. In the preceding chapters dealing with the various fields of economic activity in the period since 1860, there have been noted for the sake of continuity in treatment the more important developments in each field during the years of the first World War. These scattered bits, however, give no adequate conception of the broader problems that the country faced in the effort to mobilize its economic resources for carrying on the war. It is the purpose of this chapter, therefore, to try to present the problem as a whole: indicating its size and general character, suggesting the intricate interrelationships among the different fields of economic activity with the extensive coordination necessary to attain the desired results, and explaining the organization and methods actually adopted.

The problem was of such a size as to involve the whole economic order; so, incidentally, the attempt to explain will serve to emphasize many of the outstanding features that have come to characterize that order today. As it was the most comprehensive effort at social planning the country had ever engaged in, the experience throws light upon what is involved in such planning. It will be of interest, too, to compare the methods used in meeting the problems of this war with those employed in our earlier wars to see how much had been learned from past experience and how the changing economic order had altered the character of the problems as contrasted with earlier times. Furthermore, since the "war to end war" failed to accomplish that much desired end, it is vitally important to discover what we have yet to learn in this field.

As has previously been indicated, the outstanding economic problems that face a country in time of war may be classified under three general heads: (1) securing the goods and services necessary for carrying on the war; (2) securing the funds required to pay for these goods and services; (3) providing for the economic needs of the civilian population. Both the size and the complexity of all of these problems have been greatly increased by the methods and conditions under which modern warfare is carried on. Just as in the case of most economic activities, so warfare in modern times may be said to have taken on a mechanical character-- mechanical in the sense that it requires an enormous quantity of material

-920-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic History of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1122

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.