Opening America's Market: U. S. Foreign Trade Policy since 1776

By Alfred E. Eckes Jr. | Go to book overview

[I]f we trade away American jobs and formers' incomes for some vague concept of a "new international order," the American people will demand from their elected representatives a new order of their own, which puts their jobs, their security, and their incomes above the priorities of those who dealt them a bad deal. -- Chairman Russell Long, 1976


Epilogue

What a difference three centuries make!

Improvements in communications and technology have transformed commerce and international economic relationships. At the end of the twentieth century exporters and importers enjoy instant access to a global market through paperless electronic data interchanges. Using Internet and interactive video technology, even small and medium-sized firms can display products, solicit customers, shop for supplies, and make other arrangements for credit, insurance, and transportation. Cellular communications permit instantaneous contact among geographically diverse individuals, corporations, and governments. Jet freighters and global parcel services move high-priority shipments from Asia to America by air in a day or less. Even low-value commodity shipments cross the Atlantic or Pacific in a few weeks' time, making use of other transportation improvements such as container ships and automated port facilities. Technology has shrunk the world, making trade more efficient and peoples more interdependent. Single markets have emerged for money, services, labor, and commodities.

The eighteenth-century world of George Washington was a more frag-

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Opening America's Market: U. S. Foreign Trade Policy since 1776
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Free Trade and Economic Security, 1776-1860 1
  • 2 - Protection and Prosperity? 28
  • 3 - Unreciprocal Trade 59
  • 4 - Infamous Smoot-Hawley 100
  • 5 - Cordell Hull's Tariff Revolution 140
  • 6 - Opening America's Market, 1960-1974 178
  • 7 - Illusive Safeguards 219
  • 8 - Curbing Executive Discretion in Unfair Trade Cases 257
  • Epilogue 278
  • Notes 291
  • Bibliography 349
  • Index 383
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