The Fortunate Heirs of Freedom: Abolition & Republican Thought

By Daniel J. McInerney | Go to book overview

2
REPUBLICAN MEMORIES THE POLITICAL GOSPEL OF ABOLITION

EVIDENCE OF INHUMANITY, institutional decay, political intrigue, and moral decline in their own age convinced abolitionists that the chattel system wrought uncontrolled havoc and that its continued existence jeopardized all remaining vestiges of republican liberty. It was not just the perception of clear and present dangers, however, that alarmed abolitionists. The magnitude of slavery's threat became more apparent by adopting a broader perspective on the problem: by recognizing the chattel system's long-standing abuses, its cumulative effects on liberty, and its recurring pattern of expansion. Such historically based arguments offered compelling proof of slavery's perils. Little wonder, reformers argued, that apologists for the chattel principle either encouraged popular inattention to the past or tried to distort the record of slavery's tyrannical course. The slavery controversy unfolded not only in public arenas of debate but also in private recesses of memory.

Abolitionists believed in the distinctive character of republican historical reflection. Advocates offered lessons on the proper republican standards of historical argument. They commented on the presumed strengths and likely weaknesses of a republican people's historical sense. In addition, reformers cast their own historical surveys in terms deemed appropriate to the character of a republic. Advocates drew on a whig tradition of historical analysis in describing the dualistic struggle of liberty and tyranny, the Saxon heritage of freedom, the recovery of first principles, and the completion of neglected republican tasks. The movement's profession of history was to serve as a republican reveille, rousing the nation

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fortunate Heirs of Freedom: Abolition & Republican Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.