The Fortunate Heirs of Freedom: Abolition & Republican Thought

By Daniel J. McInerney | Go to book overview

3
"A FAITH FOR FREEDOM"
THE POLITICAL GOSPEL OF ABOLITION

HISTORIANS HAVE LONG HELD that the roots, character, and conduct of the abolition movement grew out of evangelical Protestantism. In his 1853 history of the movement, reformer William Goodell wrote that "missionary and evangelizing orators . . . were God's instruments for putting into the minds of others 'thoughts that burned,' for the emancipation of the enslaved." Dwight L. Dumond echoed this point almost nine decades later, describing abolition as "a powerful religious crusade" in which "[f]rom first to last churches were the forums, preachers the most consistent and powerful advocates, and the sin of slavery the cardinal thesis of the new social philosophy." Bertram Wyatt-Brown's 1969 study of Lewis Tappan supported the line of argument, noting that "[t]he abolitionist movement was primarily religious in its origins, its leadership, its language, and its methods of reaching the people."1

A large body of work has examined the relationship between abolition and evangelicalism. One set of studies focuses on the doctrinal influence of religion on antislavery, emphasizing the importance of beliefs in human efficacy and millennialism for the life of faith as well as for acts of reform. Believers capable of accepting the grace of God could also prepare the way of the Lord; the faithful body that detected and immediately denounced sin, especially the sin of slavery, purified not only themselves but also their churches and world in anticipation of Christ's coming.2 A second set of studies examines the organizational role of religion in abolition, describing the institutional base of evangelical churches, the schisms that rocked religious groups, the tactics drawn from the "Benevolent Empire" of reform, and the leadership cadre that emerged out of seminaries and congregations.3 A third group of

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fortunate Heirs of Freedom: Abolition & Republican Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.