A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings

By Dylan Thomas; Daniel Jones | Go to book overview

The Visitor

His hands were weary, though all night they had lain over the sheets of his bed and he had moved them only to his mouth and his wild heart. The veins ran, unhealthily blue streams, into the white sea. Milk at his side steamed out of a chipped cup. He smelt the morning, and knew that cocks in the yard were putting back their heads and crowing at the sun. What were the sheets around him if not the covering sheets of the dead? What was the busy-voiced clock, sounding between photographs of mother and dead wife, if not the voice of an old enemy? Time was merciful enough to let the sun shine on his bed, and merciless to chime the sun away when night came over and even more he needed the red light and the clear heat.

Rhianon was attendant on a dead man, and put the chipped edge of the cup to a dead lip. It could not be heart that beat under the ribs. Hearts do not beat in the dead. While he had lain ready for the inch-tape and the acid, Rhianon had cut open his chest with a book-knife, torn out the heart, put in the clock. He heard her say, for the third time, 'Drink the lovely milk.' And, feeling it run sour over his tongue, and her hand caress his forehead, he knew he was not dead. He was a living man. For many miles the months flowed into the years, rounding the dry days.

Callaghan to-day would sit and talk with him. He heard in his brain the voices of Callaghan and Rhianon battle until he slept, and tasted the blood of words. His hands were weary. He brooded over his long, white body, marking the ribs stick through the sides. The hands had held other

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A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher's Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Part I 1
  • A Prospect of the Sea 3
  • The Lemon 13
  • After the Fair 20
  • The Visitor 25
  • The Enemies 35
  • The Tree 42
  • The Map of Love 51
  • The Mouse and the Woman 58
  • The Dress 78
  • The Orchards 82
  • In the Direction of the Beginning 92
  • Part II 95
  • Conversation About Christmas 97
  • How to Be a Poet 104
  • The Followers 116
  • A Story 127
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