A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings

By Dylan Thomas; Daniel Jones | Go to book overview

The Orchards

He had dreamed that a hundred orchards on the road to the sea village had broken into flame; and all the windless afternoon tongues of fire shot through the blossom. The birds had flown up as a small red cloud grew suddenly from each branch; but as night came down with the rising of the moon and the swinging-in of the mile-away sea, a wind blew out the fires and the birds returned. He was an apple- farmer in a dream that ended as it began: with the flesh-andghost hand of a woman pointing to the trees. She twined the fair and dark tails of her hair together, smiled over the apple-fields to a sister figure who stood in a circular shadow by the walls of the vegetable garden; but the birds flew down on to her sister's shoulders, unafraid of the scarecrow face and the cross-wood nakedness under the rags. He gave the woman a kiss, and she kissed him back. Then the crows came down to her arms as she held him close; the beautiful scarecrow kissed him, pointing to the trees as the fires died.

Marlais awoke that summer morning with his lips still wet from her kiss. This was a story more terrible than the stories of the reverend madmen in the Black Book of Llareggub, for the woman near the orchards, and her sister- stick by the wall, were his scarecrow lovers for ever and ever. What were the sea-village burning orchards and the clouds at the ends of the branches to his love for these bird- provoking women? All the trees of the world might blaze suddenly from the roots to the highest leaves, but he would not sprinkle water on the shortest fiery field. She was his lover, and her sister with birds on her shoulders held him closer than the women of LlanAsia.

-82-

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A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher's Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Part I 1
  • A Prospect of the Sea 3
  • The Lemon 13
  • After the Fair 20
  • The Visitor 25
  • The Enemies 35
  • The Tree 42
  • The Map of Love 51
  • The Mouse and the Woman 58
  • The Dress 78
  • The Orchards 82
  • In the Direction of the Beginning 92
  • Part II 95
  • Conversation About Christmas 97
  • How to Be a Poet 104
  • The Followers 116
  • A Story 127
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