A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings

By Dylan Thomas; Daniel Jones | Go to book overview

A Story

If you can call it a story. There's no real beginning or end and there's very little in the middle. It is all about a day's outing, by charabanc, to Porthcawl, which, of course, the charabanc never reached, and it happened when I was so high and much nicer.

I was staying at the time with my uncle and his wife. Although she was my aunt, I never thought of her as anything but the wife of my uncle, partly because he was so big and trumpeting and red-hairy and used to fill every inch of the hot little house like an old buffalo squeezed into an airing cupboard, and partly because she was so small and silk and quick and made no noise at all as she whisked about on padded paws, dusting the china dogs, feeding the buffalo, setting the mousetraps that never caught her; and once she sleaked out of the room, to squeak in a nook or nibble in the hayloft, you forgot she had ever been there.

But there he was, always, a steaming hulk of an uncle, his braces straining like hawsers, crammed behind the counter of the tiny shop at the front of the house, and breathing like a brass band; or guzzling and blustery in the kitchen over his gutsy supper, too big for everything except the great black boats of his boots. As he ate, the house grew smaller; he billowed out over the furniture, the loud check meadow of his waistcoat littered, as though after a picnic, with cigarette ends, peelings, cabbage stalks, birds' bones, gravy; and the forest fire is hair crackled among the hooked hams from the ceiling. She was so small she could hit him only if she stood on a chair, and every Saturday night at half

-127-

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A Prospect of the Sea: And Other Stories and Prose Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher's Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Part I 1
  • A Prospect of the Sea 3
  • The Lemon 13
  • After the Fair 20
  • The Visitor 25
  • The Enemies 35
  • The Tree 42
  • The Map of Love 51
  • The Mouse and the Woman 58
  • The Dress 78
  • The Orchards 82
  • In the Direction of the Beginning 92
  • Part II 95
  • Conversation About Christmas 97
  • How to Be a Poet 104
  • The Followers 116
  • A Story 127
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