Marching toward the 21st Century: Military Manpower and Recruiting

By Mark J. Eitelberg; Stephen L. Mehay | Go to book overview

Preface

This book is a product of the "Army Futures" project, a major study of various trends that are likely to affect the manpower and recruiting policies of the U.S. Army in the years ahead. The research effort was sponsored by the U.S. Army Recruiting Command and directed by the editors of this volume at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California. A two-day conference was held in January 1992 in Arlington, Virginia, as part of the "Army Futures" project. The conference featured over 20 speakers, including senior officials from the U.S. Army and Department of Defense, distinguished scholars, and subject area experts from several government agencies.

The chapters in Marching Toward the 21st Century are drawn mostly from the research papers presented at the "Army Futures" conference. The conference itself benefited from the participation and contributions of several individuals whose work is not formally recognized as part of this book. These include Lieutenant General William H. Reno; Lieutenant General H. Binford Peay III; General Dennis J. Reimer; Ronald E. Kutscher of the Bureau of Labor Statistics; Marvin Cetron of Forecasting International, Ltd.; Richard Fernandez of the Congressional Budget Office; Mady W. Segal of the University of Maryland; Thomas G. Sticht of Applied Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, Inc.; David P. Boesel of the U.S. Department of Education; and Christopher Jehn, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Force Management and Personnel. The editors are also grateful to Mr. Juri Toomepuu, Director of Research and Studies at the U.S. Army Recruiting Command, and Major General Jack C. Wheeler, Commander of the U.S. Army Recruiting Command. Nita Raichart of Type Casting in Monterey, California, provided expert word processing of the manuscript, and the editors extend their appreciation for her patient and skillful assistance.

It should be noted that the views expressed here are those of the authors and should not be ascribed to any organization or other person unless so stated.

-xiii-

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