Marching toward the 21st Century: Military Manpower and Recruiting

By Mark J. Eitelberg; Stephen L. Mehay | Go to book overview

Introduction

The American military is in the midst of a fundamental metamorphosis, the likes of which have not occurred since the advent of the all-volunteer force and possibly since the end of World War II. The conclusion of the Cold War, followed by Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, several troop deployments within the United States, and the venture in Somalia have helped to redefine the goals of our national security, but they have also left a military whose very form and being are still uncertain. What is certain is that the new military will be restructured along almost every major dimension: It will be smaller; it will have new missions, a new force structure, and a different active-reserve mix; and it is likely to be characterized by much greater consolidation of common functions. It could perhaps be argued that certain institutions, such as the military, are always in a state of flux, bending to the economic, political, and strategic realities of the day. But in this case, the changes are likely to be more basic, more embracing, and more sustained than any reorganization or defense overhaul of the modern era.

While some of the directions in which the military is headed are clear--force size, for example--others, such as the active-reserve mix and missions, are still hazy at best. Directions typically shift with turnovers in political leadership, shifts in the economy, and reevaluations of national or international security. Therefore, it is important to sort out the myriad of indicators and to identify the dominant forces of change. It is also not obvious which social, economic, or demographic factors hold the greatest importance for the military, which measures of the factors are most accurate or valid, and which interpretations of the measures are best. Despite these problems, careful analysis of the available data on environmental change can highlight areas of greatest importance to America's armed forces and provide the military's manpower planners with the basic building blocks for developing future policies and strategies.

The focus of this book is on the trends and changes in American society that may ultimately define the nature of the armed forces at the beginning of the 21st century. The volume is particularly interested in pinpointing factors that are likely to affect military manpower and recruiting. It seeks answers to a number of important questions: Among the many identified trends or changes--demographic,

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marching toward the 21st Century: Military Manpower and Recruiting
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.