Marching toward the 21st Century: Military Manpower and Recruiting

By Mark J. Eitelberg; Stephen L. Mehay | Go to book overview

4
The Demographic Context of Army
Family Support Policy

Peter A. Morrison

The Army is part of American society and, as such, is not immune to the social and demographic forces that shape it. Still, historically the Army was always somewhat isolated from the rest of American society. Soldiers worked and lived on a post, which was the center of social and recreational activity. The post was in many ways a self-contained community, and that isolation tended to shield it from the effects of many social currents. Furthermore, most soldiers would serve a number of years outside the United States, removed from social forces at home. But today this is all changing. Recent transformations in world politics promise to reduce that isolation and tighten the links between Army families and society. As the patterns of military life come closer to the rest of society's, the Army would do well to understand the specific demographic forces at work and begin crafting policies and procedures to meet the increased and perhaps new needs of its members.

Some of these demographic changes have already made an impact. The typical Army family once consisted of a male soldier, a wife who did not work outside the home, and one or two children. But in the early 1990s, families in the Army (as in civilian life) are more diverse and complex. Increasingly, female spouses hold paying jobs, and more families have both spouses on active duty; singleparent Army families are headed more often by female members; and more personnel stationed abroad are accompanied by family members. Such changes have reshaped families' needs and altered their demands for services that affect their readiness and quality of life. More generally, these changes have affected the Army as an institution and will continue to do so during the 1990s.

Demographic transformations have made it harder for many families to meet the ongoing needs of their dependent members. Future Army policy will have to take note of this if it is to reinforce its families. As competition grows between the roles of soldier and mainstay of a household, the Army will have to think harder about family concerns.

The Army surely will change to fit the post-Cold War world. Those changes will affect its families. In light of this, four areas of demographic change are considered: an older population, a multicultural future, reconfiguration of families,

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marching toward the 21st Century: Military Manpower and Recruiting
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.