Changing the World: A Framework for the Study of Creativity

By David Henry Feldman; Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi et al. | Go to book overview

2
The Fruits of Asynchrony: A Psychological Examination of Creativity

Howard Gardner Constance Wolf


A "POTTED HISTORY" OF PICASSO AND CUBISM

The name " Pablo Picasso" and the founding of cubism are virtually synonymous. According to the widely known story, Picasso was a preternaturally gifted young artist who was drawing like a master at a young age (for biographical details, see Barr [ 1946], Gilot and Lake [ 1964], and Penrose [ 1958]). The sketches of his childhood, and even the scribbles in his school notebooks, showed enormous skill and imaginativeness. By early adolescence, Picasso had already exhausted the art educational resources of his native Spain. Indeed, according to the legend--and this particular legend has the ring of truth--young Pablo was so accomplished that his father, also an artist, ceased to paint after his son had reached the age of fourteen.

Visiting Paris while still a teenager, Picasso soon had mastered the various styles of Western painting that had been developed by 1900. He was able to imitate the great masters of the past with fidelity, and his paintings and drawings reflected the trends and schools that characterized la Belle Epoque. The periods of his art at that time merited and have come to be known by special names: the Blue Period of 1901-1904, when he concentrated on figures, using monochrome blue toning; and the Rose Period of 1904-1906, when terra-cotta tonalities brightened canvases full of circus themes or figures in a "classical" repose. While not yet famous, Picasso was

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Changing the World: A Framework for the Study of Creativity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - A Framework for the Study of Creativity 1
  • References 40
  • 2 - The Fruits of Asynchrony: A Psychological Examination of Creativity 47
  • Notes 66
  • References 66
  • 3 - The Creators' Patterns 69
  • Notes 82
  • References 83
  • 4 - Creativity: Proof That Development Occurs 85
  • References 98
  • 5 - Creativity: Dreams, Insights, and Transformations 103
  • Note 132
  • References 132
  • 6 - The Domain of Creativity 135
  • References 155
  • 7 - Mamas Versus Genes: Notes from the Culture Wars 159
  • 8 - Conclusion: Creativity Research on the Verge 173
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 179
  • About the Authors 181
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