Changing the World: A Framework for the Study of Creativity

By David Henry Feldman; Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi et al. | Go to book overview

stimulate, nurture, and catalyze efforts at transforming a part of the culture. These new artifacts make the environment different from what it was, an awareness of which is a critical and unique quality of human experience.

Taking the two points together, I have come to the conclusion that genuine, qualitative novel thoughts and ideas do occur. It is possible to make something new under the sun that is not directly a function of the biological potential of the individual. In fact, when one looks around at the results of humanity's efforts to transform the world, it is stunning to reflect on how much of our reality consists of a continuously emerging set of humanly crafted new things. Anyone who argues against development in the sense of true constructed novelty must ignore these manifest fruits of human labor and expression to an amazing degree.

Although I must caution that most of what I have learned is based on my own experience, and is also highly speculative, I know that I did not contrive the typewriter I am using, the chair I am sitting on, or the light that I use to illuminate my office, nor, for that matter, the numerous other things that are being changed in my culture even as I write. To doubt creativity under such circumstances is simply beyond my comprehension.


NOTE
1.
It was somewhat later that I changed the name of creative developmental transitions to "unique" (Figure 5).

REFERENCES

Bickhard M. H. ( 1979). "On necessary and specific capabilities in evolution and development". Human Development, 22, 217-224.

Bickhard M. H. ( 1980). "A model of developmental and psychological processes". Genetic Psychology Monographs, 102, 61-116.

Brandt R. S. ( 1986, May). "On creativity and thinking skins: A conversation with David Perkins". Educational Leadership, pp. 12-18.

Campbell R. L., & Bickhard M. H. ( 1986). Knowing levels and developmental stages. Basel: Karger.

Cavalli-Sforza L. L., Feldman M. W., Chen K. H., & Dornbusch S. M. ( 1982). "Theory and observation in cultural transmission". Science, 218, 19-27.

Chomsky N. ( 1980). "On cognitive structures and their development". In M. Piattelli-Palmarini (Ed.), Language and learning: The debate between Jean Piaget and Noam Chomsky (pp. 35-54). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

-132-

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Changing the World: A Framework for the Study of Creativity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - A Framework for the Study of Creativity 1
  • References 40
  • 2 - The Fruits of Asynchrony: A Psychological Examination of Creativity 47
  • Notes 66
  • References 66
  • 3 - The Creators' Patterns 69
  • Notes 82
  • References 83
  • 4 - Creativity: Proof That Development Occurs 85
  • References 98
  • 5 - Creativity: Dreams, Insights, and Transformations 103
  • Note 132
  • References 132
  • 6 - The Domain of Creativity 135
  • References 155
  • 7 - Mamas Versus Genes: Notes from the Culture Wars 159
  • 8 - Conclusion: Creativity Research on the Verge 173
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 179
  • About the Authors 181
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