Northern Labor and Antislavery: A Documentary History

By Philip S. Foner; Herbert Shapiro | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
An example of the antislavery movement's long-term influence upon the working class is found in the activity of Ira Steward, New England-based labor leader, who, following the Civil War, drew upon the logic of opposition to slavery as support for the cause of reducing the workday to eight hours. See David Roodiger, "Ira Steward and the Anti- Slavery Origins of American Eight-Hour Theory", Labor History (Summer 1986), 410-26; there is also David Brion Davis's pertinent observation that in the United States "radical labor leaders and socialists found that parallels between black and white slavery retained their resonance well into the twentieth century." See David Brion Davis, "Reflections on Abolitionism and Ideological Hegemony", in Thomas Bender, ed., The Antislavery Debate ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 161-79, p. 175.
2.
Patricia Hollis, "Anti-Slavery and British Working-Class Radicalism in the Years of Reform", in Christine Bolt and Seymour Drescher , eds. Anti-Slavery, Religion and Reform: Essays in Memory of Roger Anstey ( Folkesstone: William Dawson and Sons, 1980), pp. 299, 302, 309-11.
3.
See David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770-1823 ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1975), pp. 350, 361, 364-65; David Brion Davis, "The Perils of Doing History by A Historical Abstraction: A Reply to Thomas L. Haskell's AHR Forum Reply", in Thomas Bender, ed., The Antislavery Debate ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992):, 290-309, pp. 308-09; Davis, "Reflections on Abolitionism and Ideological Hegemony", pp. 172, 173, 179. In this rejoinder to criticism voiced by Thomas L. Haskell, Davis writes that English employers wished to instill certain values in the working class, those of "thinking casually, keeping promises, learning to calculate, compute, and take responsibility for the remote consequences of one's actions." It should, however, also be noted that such values suited the needs of an authentic working-class sensibility.
4.
Seymour Drescher, Capitalism and Antislavery ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), pp. 145-166.
5.
Betty Fladeland, Abolitionists and Working-Class Problems in the Age of Industrialization ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University, 1984), xi-xiii, 175.
6.
R. J.M. Blackett, Building an Antislavery Wall ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1983), xii, 18, 21-11, 106, 147, 198, 200-01; John Blassingame writes about the reception accorded Douglass in Britain, "Working men contributed their labor to prepare halls in which Douglass spoke, attended his lectures in considerable numbers, sent antislavery petitions to the United States after hearing him, and sang ballads about him." See John W. Blassingame, ed., The Frederick Douglass Papers, Series One, Vol. 1 ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979), lvii.
7.
Karl Marx, quoted in Philip S. Foner, British Labor and the American Civil War ( New York: Holmes and Meier, 1981), p. 82.
8.
Marcus Cunliffe, Chattel Slavery and Wage Slavery ( Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1979), pp. 19, 109.
9.
J. M. Hernon Jr., "British Sympathies in the American Civil War", Journal of Southern History ( August 1967), 356-67, 361, 362.
10.
Royden Harrison, quoted in Philip S. Foner, op.cit., pp. 15, 18.
11.
Mary Ellison, Support for Secession: Lancashire and the American Civil War ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1972), pp. 6,

-xxvii-

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Northern Labor and Antislavery: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in American History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xxvii
  • I- Wage Labor and Chattel Slavery 1
  • II- Abolition Addresses Labor 83
  • III- Land Monopoly, Universal Reform and Slavery 126
  • IV- Voices of Labor on Slavery and Abolition 195
  • V- From the 1850s Crisis to Civil War 242
  • Index 297
  • About the Editors *
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