Northern Labor and Antislavery: A Documentary History

By Philip S. Foner; Herbert Shapiro | Go to book overview

III
Land Monopoly,
Universal Reform
and Slavery

THE DOCUMENTS IN THIS CHAPTER FOCUS ON THE STRUGGLE AGAINST MONOPOLY OF LAND OWNERSHIP AND THE RELATION BETWEEN AGITATION FOR LAND REFORM AND OPPOSITION TO CHATTEL SLAVERY.

1. The Voice of Industry reprints an article from Young America, organ of George Henry Evans's National Reform Association, making the point that the horrors of the slave trade will continue so long as land monopoly exists.


HORRORS OF SLAVE TRADING

Intelligence has been received at Salem from Monrovia of the capture of an American Slaver, the bark Pons, of Philadelphia, with 900 slaves on board, by the U.S. Ship Yorktown, Capt. Bell. The Pons was from Cabenda, bound to Rio Janeiro, and had originally shipped 913 between the ages of 8 and 30, 47 of them females, and had left 400 or 500 more at their factory. In getting from where the capture took place to Monrovia about 150 of the poor wretches died, some jumping overboard in despair.

A letter from one of the Methodist Missionaries gives a horrid account of the sufferings of the slaves, and says it is utterly impossible for language to convey an appropriate idea of the horrors of their situation. The living and the dying were huddled together with less care than is bestowed upon the brute creation--the thermometer at 100 to 120 in the hold. Most of the slaves were in a state of nudity, and many had worn their skin through, producing putrid ulcers, which fed swarms of flies.

Thus it will be seen that this infernal traffic is carried on in spite of all the navies, and undoubtedly will be so long as Land Monopoly is suffered. Land Monopolists buy the slaves and desperate lacklanders, the refuse of the fighting navies, are employed to steal them. How important, then, that we immediately abolish Land Monopoly in the U.S., that the principle of Equality in the Soil may spread over the continent and adjacent islands, and thus forever put an end to the atrocities of the slave trade, and to the power

-126-

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Northern Labor and Antislavery: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in American History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xxvii
  • I- Wage Labor and Chattel Slavery 1
  • II- Abolition Addresses Labor 83
  • III- Land Monopoly, Universal Reform and Slavery 126
  • IV- Voices of Labor on Slavery and Abolition 195
  • V- From the 1850s Crisis to Civil War 242
  • Index 297
  • About the Editors *
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