New Poverty: Families in Postmodern Society

By David Cheal | Go to book overview

2
Poverty and Progress

Conquering poverty, and its attendant social evils, has long been considered a mark of progress in modern societies. One of the most highly publicized examples of this was the War on Poverty that was launched in the United States in the 1960s. Success in this "war" came to be seen as an important criterion of national achievement. The eventual public perception that antipoverty programs had failed, especially in dealing with the problems of urban blacks, contributed much to growing pessimism about lack of progress felt by U.S. opinion leaders in the 1980s and 1990s (Staff of the Chicago Tribune, 1986; Kelso, 1994). 1

In the present chapter we will take a look at how ideas about poverty have evolved over the past century. Poverty is a highly politicized issue. Public thinking about the poor is greatly influenced by political movements and by shifts in the balance of power. At the same time, public perceptions of poverty have been shaped in the twentieth century by the research findings reported by social scientists. Contemporary ideas about poverty are therefore partly produced by the agenda and methods of the social sciences.

Attempts to link attacks on poverty with national goals of social progress have a long history in the social sciences. At the end of the nineteenth century, and in the early twentieth century, progressive reformers realized that acting on the problem of poverty required information derived from social research. Some of the earliest research on poverty was

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Poverty: Families in Postmodern Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Table of Contents xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • 1 - Families in Postmodernity 1
  • 2 - Poverty and Progress 17
  • 3 - Sorting Out the Poor 35
  • 4 - Marriage and Its Aftermath 55
  • 5 - The Birth of Poverty 75
  • 6 - Family Work Systems 97
  • 7 - Shallow Income Pools 117
  • 8 - The Economic Life Course 135
  • 9 - Shifting Entitlements 157
  • 10 - The Postmodernization of Poverty 173
  • Bibliography 187
  • Index 203
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 209

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.