Don't Panic: The Psychology of Emergency Egress and Ingress

By Jerome M. Chertkoff; Russell H. Kushigian | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
Trans World Airlines Jet Crash, July 30, 1992

On July 30, 1992, at 1716 (5:16 P.M.), Trans World Airlines (TWA) flight 843 from New York to San Francisco received clearance to leave its loading gate at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). The plane was a wide-body Lockheed L1011.

The flight had a crew of 12: Captain William Kinkead, First Officer Dennis Hergert, Second Officer (flight engineer) Charles Long, and nine flight attendants. There were 280 passengers, including two off-duty pilots, both seated in cockpit jumpseats, and five off-duty flight attendants, three seated in extra cabin attendant positions and two seated in passenger seats. Every seat on the plane was occupied.

As directed by ground control, the plane taxied to runway 13R/31L, the longest runway, 14,572 feet in length, at JFK. At 1740, the plane was cleared for takeoff.

First Officer Dennis Hergert was at the controls. At TWA, it was standard operating procedure when the first officer is at the controls during takeoff for the captain to control the thrust levers until the landing gear is retracted. Captain Kinkead advanced the power for takeoff, and the plane accelerated normally. At 1741:09.4, flight 843 lifted off the runway.

As the plane became airborne, the first officer and the captain felt their control columns shake. The plane had two independent Angle of Attack (AOA) sensors, one on each side of the fuselage. These sensors detect when the plane's AOA, given the flap/slat configuration, is approaching the value at which a stall will occur. This stickshaker warning mechanism caused the captain's and first officer's control columns to vibrate. Although the control columns were shaking, indicating that a stall was imminent, in reality the engines were functioning normally and there was no danger of a stall. A mechanical malfunction in the right AOA sensor had sent a false warning.

The first officer, in reaction to his vibrating control column, either pushed or allowed the control column to move forward, thereby diminishing the rate of acceleration somewhat. At 1741:11.4, the first officer said, "Gettin a stall" ( National Transportation Safety Board, 1993, p. 3). At 1741:12.8, the first officer said,

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Don't Panic: The Psychology of Emergency Egress and Ingress
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 145

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.