Don't Panic: The Psychology of Emergency Egress and Ingress

By Jerome M. Chertkoff; Russell H. Kushigian | Go to book overview

Annotated Bibliography
This section is intended as a guide for those who would like to read further about the events described in the book. Included are our major sources of information, not all of them.
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1. The Baltimore Sun. Detailed accounts of the Front Street Theatre Fire, including many feature articles, can be found in The Baltimore Sun of Saturday, December 28, 1895, and Monday, December 30, 1895. Short articles can be found in some subsequent editions, leading up to the report on the grand jury investigations, which appeared in the Saturday Baltimore Sun of January 11, 1896.
2. Gold M. ( 1948). The Front Street Theatre (from its beginning to 1838). Unpublished master's thesis, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. The fire of 1895 is mentioned only briefly on pages 13-14, but the thesis does contain a picture of the exterior of the theatre as it appeared in 1829 and presumably as it still appeared in 1895. This picture is taken from a woodcarving in the archives of the Peale Museum, Baltimore, Maryland.
3. The New York Times. A full column on the front page of Saturday, December 28, 1895, was devoted to the event.

CHAPTER 3: IROQUOIS THEATRE FIRE, DECEMBER 30, 1903
1. The Chicago Tribune. The Chicago Tribune had extensive coverage of the fire in its edition of Thursday, December 31, 1903. Numerous follow-up articles appeared throughout the month of January 1904, culminating in the grand jury report on Tuesday, January 26, 1904.
2. Foy E., & Harlow A. F. ( 1928). Clowning through life. New York: E. P. Dutton . In Foy's autobiography, all of chapter 20 is devoted to the Iroquois Theatre Fire. The chapter contains a picture of Eddie Foy in his costume as Sister Anne in Mr. Blue Beard.
3. Guenzel L. ( 1993). Retrospects: The Iroquois Theatre fire. Elmhurst, IL:

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