Cost Containment for Higher Education: Strategies for Public Policy and Institutional Administration

By William Brand Simpson | Go to book overview

2
Strategies of a Financial Nature
Cost containment by government can be undertaken at the macro-level through various established financial practices as well as by ad hoc actions.
Legislative authorization of programs before funds may be appropriated: use of incremental, zero-base, or program budgets; calculation of multiyear costs; decisions on entitlement status of programs; sunset clauses.
Legislative budget resolution process prior to appropriation bills: consideration of effect on balancing the federal budget; use of nonpartisan legislative budget analysts, congressional finance committees, and congressional budget office.
Legislative appropriation process: appropriating less funding than authorized; negotiating a House-Senate reconciliation bill offsetting some program increases by decreases in other programs.
Executive branch controls: deficit estimates by executive branch budget office and general accounting office; veto of interim continuing resolutions; suspension of government spending in the absence of a budget having been passed; veto of legislation (line-item veto in some states); partial or full sequestration of approved funding; spreading appropriation over additional years; placing a freeze on further obligation of appropriated funds; withdrawal of receipts from a revolving fund or of operating surplus from an independent fund.
Reducing general revenues available: preset limits on revenues; reducing tax rates; indexing tax brackets to limit the public sector; limiting tax collection efforts.

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